Last edited by Doulrajas
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

3 edition of Microbial issues pertaining to the Canadian concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste found in the catalog.

Microbial issues pertaining to the Canadian concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste

by Simcha Stroes-Gascoyne

  • 100 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by Whiteshell Laboratories in Pinawa, Man .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Radioactive waste disposal in the ground -- Environmental aspects -- Canada

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby S. Stroes-Gascoyne and J.M. West.
    SeriesAECL research (Series) -- 10808
    ContributionsWest, J. M.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTD898.13.C3 S87 1994
    The Physical Object
    Pagination39 p. ;
    Number of Pages39
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19832085M
    ISBN 100660155087

    A process of recycling protactinium to enhance the utilization of radioactively hot uranium in nuclear fuel for the purpose of making both fresh and spent fuel more resistant to proliferation. legacy of growing stockpiles of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level radi-oactive wastes. Approximately , metric tons of high-level radioac-tive waste is now in temporary storage awaiting disposal Most is in the form of spent nuclear fuel rods, but a substantial portion consists of residues from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel.

    Environmental Assessment Report on High Level Waste Disposal Concept For the Complete Report EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. In a joint statement, the governments of Canada and Ontario directed Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop the concept of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel wastes. From the uranium mine to waste disposal 7> The nuclear fuel cycle 2 > CONTENTS 3 introduction Fuel is a material that can be burnt to pro- vide heat. The most familiar fuels are wood, coal, natural gas and oil. By analogy, the ura-File Size: 8MB.

    Discussions about nuclear waste management must be related to the production of nuclear energy, as the most hazardous waste is produced during energy production. The question guiding this paper is whether spent fuel 1 is to be disposed of directly or to be reused in the fuel cycle, referred to as the open and closed fuel cycle, respectively [ 5 ].Cited by: Disposal – Emplacement of spent nuclear fuel in an appropriate engineered facility without the intention of retrieval. Reprocessing – The chemical process which separates uranium and plutonium from the waste (fission products) in the spent nuclear fuel. Spent nuclear fuel – Nuclear fuel that is permanently removed from a reactorFile Size: KB.


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Microbial issues pertaining to the Canadian concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste by Simcha Stroes-Gascoyne Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Microbial issues pertaining to the Canadian concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste = Questions à examiner quant aux microbes lors du développement du concept Canadien de stockage permanent des déchets de combustible nucléaire. [Simcha Stroes-Gascoyne; J M West; Whiteshell Laboratories.].

This concept, based on a multibarrier system, would involve disposal of nuclear fuel waste in titanium or copper containers, surrounded by compacted clay-based buffer and backfill materials, in a vault – m deep in granitic rock of the Canadian by: Simcha Stroes-Gascoyne has written: 'Microbial issues pertaining to the Canadian concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste' -- subject(s): Environmental aspects, Environmental aspects of Radioactive waste disposal in the ground, Radioactive waste disposal in the ground.

Canadian Journal of Microbiology,42(4):An overview of microbial research related to high-level nuclear waste disposal with emphasis on the Canadian concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste. Simcha Stroes-Gascoyne, Julia M. West. During this same period, the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), along with its industry and government partners, worked on developing a concept for the ultimate disposal of Canada’s nuclear fuel waste.

In a nutshell, the concept was to bury all of this waste in the Canadian Shield to 1, metres deep, where it would be safe essentially “forever.”. “Nuclear fuel waste” for the purposes of the NFWA is defined as “irradiated fuel bundles removed from a commercial or research nuclear fission reactor.” 6 This term is to be interpreted as synonymous with used nuclear fuel, the terminology preferred by.

To store radioactive waste, the Canadian nuclear industry applies a variety of measures that correspond to the varying levels of risk involved.

These range from onsite storage of low-level waste until it is safe to handle and dispose of, to specialized cooling and long-term containment of spent fuel bundles.

To address the issue of high level nuclear waste is to address the issue of risk and shared social. values. Risk is an inherent characteristic of any project or proposal to deal with any level of. nuclear wastes, as all of these wastes are potentially detrimental to human health.

Radioactive waste produced in Canada is managed safely in specially designed facilities. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulates and licenses these facilities, in order to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment.

Toward a viable nuclear waste disposal program to uranium fuel. The possible application and related challenges of thorium fuels in different reactor types and designs such as light water. For spent fuel and high-level waste, which is highly radioactive and requires cooling and shielding, the situation differs.

Technologies and concepts to dispose of this type of waste have been developed, but are not yet being implemented. The countries which have advanced programmes and good progress in the area of spent fuel and high-level.

Contemporary citizens tend to perceive nuclear energy and nuclear waste issues more pessimistically than does the nuclear technical community (Tanaka, ). The divergence in view cannot be attributed solely to a lack of public understanding or familiarity with radioactivity or with technical aspects of waste.

The objective is to isolate the nuclear fuel waste from the biosphere in such a manner that no responsi- bility or burden would be passed on to future genera- tions.

Canada does not reprocess used fuel and, conse- quently, the direct disposal of fuel is the primary focus of the fuel by: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited has developed a concept for the permanent disposal of nuclear fuel waste in Canada.

A program was initiated in to address and quantify the potential effects of microbial action on the integrity of the multibarrier system on which the disposal concept is by: Issues in radioactive waste disposal While there is general agreement on disposal concepts and on many aspects of a safety philosophy, consensus on a number of issues remains to be achieved.

spent nuclear fuel (and possibly also for those containing high level wastes) there is aFile Size: 2MB. to the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program SECOND EDITION compiled by E.R. Lyon, P. Gillespie, and J. Tamm Abstract This document describes the administrative structure and major research and development components of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program.

It outlines the participating organizations. Current Storage Sites for High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel and Repository with License under Review. Two federal agencies—the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and DOE—are primarily responsible for the regulation and disposal of the nation's spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste.

The Nuclear Fuel Waste Act results from the response of the Canadian federal government (December ) to the recommendations of the report of the Environmental Review panel (March ) on AECL's nuclear fuel waste management proposal.

The report concluded that the plan for Deep Geological Disposal is technically sound, and that nuclear waste. Based on the qualitative discussion of the performance of the multi-barrier system for geological disposal, and of the components that comprise this system, together with the results of comprehensive quantitative analyses carried out in a number of countries, including Canada, it is concluded that the international consensus that geological disposal can best achieve the goal of safely managing nuclear fuel waste Cited by: 8.

Until a permanent disposal repository for used nuclear fuel is built, nuclear power plant operators must safely store this fuel under license at their plant sites in these containers. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission website provides more detailed information on the types of storage and the features of storage canisters for high-level waste.

The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) of Canada was established in under the Nuclear Fuel Waste Act (NFWA) to investigate approaches for managing Canada’s used nuclear tly, nuclear power plants are operating in Ontario and New Brunswick. The Act required Canadian electricity generating companies which produce used nuclear fuel to establish a waste Founder: Elizabeth Dowdeswell, Founding President.American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library.

Open Library. Community Audio. Featured movies All video latest This Just In Prelinger Archives Democracy Now! Full text of "FINAL REPORT ON THE MANAGEMENT OF NUCLEAR FUEL WASTE - ONTARIO".The CHANCE project aims to address the specific issue of the characterisation of conditioned radioactive waste (CRW).

The characterisation of fully or partly conditioned radioactive waste is a specific issue because unlike for raw waste, its characterisation is more complex and needs specific non-destructive techniques and methodologies.